Representation of Women in Philosophy, Again

Since Leiter just quoted data on women in philosophy faculty positions collected by Kathryn Norlock, and over at Feminist Philosophers someone asked for a breakdown by tenure status, here it is. This is survey data from 2003 (the same dataset from which the figures Leiter quotes come) which means there is sampling error. The first (grey) line gives the percentages for each category of the total, the second line gives the percentage of women per category (i.e., 6.3% of all surveyed philosophy faculty are tenured women; of the tenured philosophy faculty surveyed, 17.1% are women). You can make your own tables here.  See also previous discussion and comparison with other fields and data on the pipeline here and here

The problem is that the standard errors in the survey results are really high. We talked about this in the previous post, noting that this data isn’t very reliable.  The data was compiled from a survey of approx 18,000 faculty, of which 1.9% were philosophers. So it’s based on a sample of about 350 out of a total of approx. 23,000 philosophy faculty (full and part time) overall in 2003. In the case of these figures in particular, what the survey tells us is only that the percentage of women among tenured philosophy faculty is somewhere between 8.5% and 25.6% (at 95% confidence). (Edited, thanks to Jingjing Wu for help with the stats.)

Tenure status and gender Tenured, male
(%)
Tenured, female
(%)
On tenure track, male
(%)
On tenure track, female
(%)
Not on tenure track, male
(%)
Not on tenure track, female
(%)
Total
Estimates
Total 19.3 8.7 7.1 5.1 31.1 28.7 100%
  per category   31.0    41.8    47.9  42.5
Philosophy 30.5 6.3 10.5 1.5 39.0 12.3 100%
  per category   17.1    12.5    23.9  21.0
Standard Errors
Total 0.30 0.19 0.20 0.15 0.30 0.22  
Philosophy 3.15 1.80 2.04 0.67 4.78 2.73  
Weighted Sample Sizes (n/1,000s)
Total 1211.85            
Philosophy 13.19            
NOTE: Rows may not add up to 100% due to rounding.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04).
Computation by NCES QuickStats on 2/16/2011

NB: I’ve switched blogging software. If you click a link and land on a page and wonder why you can’t comment, take the url, e.g., http://people.ucalgary.ca/~rzach/logblog/2009/10/women-in-academic-pipeline.html and replace ‘people’ by ‘www’ and ‘logblog’ by ‘blog’ to get to the current version like so:
http://www.ucalgary.ca/~rzach/blog/2009/10/women-in-academic-pipeline.html

Visual Representation of Philosophers' Significance and Influence

My colleagues Marian Dörk and Sheelagh Carpendale over in the Computer Science department have taken data on philosophers from Freebase as a test case for their EdgeMaps visualization project.

Freebase provides data about interests, professions, birthdates, influence connections, and other relations from Wikipedia. For the purpose of this paper, we have constrained the dataset to philosophers that influenced at least one other philosopher, resulting in 42 philosophers. For each philosopher we store the name, birthdate, description, an image, interests, and professions. Furthermore, we store the directed influence links between philosophers.

Go to the EdgeMaps page, click on the "open demo" button, and explore. The button in the top left switches between a timeline view and an influence "yarnball".Of course, the map is only as good as the data that went in–see the example of Frege below which is missing a big fat influence arrow coming from Kant!–but still, very cool!

EdgeMap of Frege

Logic in the Undergraduate Mathematics Curriculum

As part of the work of the Committee on Logic Education of the Association of Symbolic Logic, Marcia Groszek and Tamara Lakins organized a special session on logic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum at the Joint Mathematics Meeting last month in New Orleans.  The session was very successful: excellent talks, good turnout.  The talks were:

  • Breadth, Depth, Disputes, Drama, and Campus Pranks:  The Possibilities and Pleasures of Co-teaching Logic, by James M. Henle
  • A Course Emphasizing Mathematical Logic and Reasoning that is Appropriate for General Education and Elementary Education Majors, by Warren W. Esty
  • Seemingly Abstruse Logical Principles Have Practical Importance, by Susanna S. Epp
  • Applied Logic Courses in the Mathematics Curriculum, by Lawrence S. Moss
  • Technology in Logic Education:  Courseware, Automated Assessment and Data Minin, by Dave Barker-Plummer

You can find abstracts and links to the presentation materials on the ASL CLE’s page on the special session.